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Calendar of Events
Calendar of Events

Please visit our calendar regularly to view and RSVP to the many wonderful programs from the JCRC

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Greater Washington Interfaith/Social Justice Organizations
  • Hunger/Homelessness/Poverty
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  • Community Ministries of Rockville: Community Ministries of Rockville’s mission is to give voice to conscience and serve human need. In support of this mission they combine the efforts of congregations to provide shelter and empowerment for the homeless, assist the frail elderly in their homes, and house working, formerly homeless men. These are just a few of things they do. http://www.cmrocks.org/index.html
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    Interfaith Works: Formerly Community Ministry of Montgomery County, Interfaith Works is a non-sectarian interfaith coalition of more than 140 member and affiliated congregations representing over 65,000 families of many faiths, working together to meet the needs of the poor in Montgomery County. http://www.iworksmc.org/
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  • Unitarian Universalists for Social Justice: A Unitarian Universalist partnership of congregations, organizations and indi-viduals deeply committed to our religious principles of human dignity, justice and compassion for all people. They work in the Baltimore, Washington, and Northern Virginia area to help Unitarian Universalist activists carryout their social and economic justice agendas. http://www.uusj.net/uuj1/index.php
  • Action In Montgomery: Action In Montgomery is a multi-racial, multi-faith, strictly non-partisan, County-wide citizens’ organization, rooted in 31 local congregations and asso-ciations that work together to effect social and economic change in Montgomery County, Maryland. AIM is affiliated with the Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF), the oldest and largest national, congregation-based, community organizing network in the United States. Organizations associated with IAF, like AIM have produced impressive results in training thousands of ethnically, culturally, and economically diverse leaders to take action on community, city, and state issues. http://www.actioninmontgomery.org/
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  • Associates for Renewal in Education (ARE):  has been serving the Washington, DC, community for over thirty years. ARE is a multi-service agency working primarily with at-risk and undeserved infants, children, youth, and adults to improve the quality of their lives through intervention, education, and employment and life-skills training. ARE provides a continuum of care from early childhood centers to parenting and job readiness programs. In addition, we provide linkages to other agencies that extend our services. Administratively, we focus our service delivery through an education division and a residential services division, with sites located throughout the city. http://www.areinc.org/
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  • Bread for the City:  started in 1974, and created by a consortium of churches, is a front line agency serving Washington’s poor. Today, we operate two Centers in the District of Columbia and provide direct services to low-income residents of Washington, DC. All of our services are free. Our mission is to provide comprehensive services, including food, clothing, medical care, legal and social services to low-income Washington, DC residents in an atmosphere of dignity and respect. http://www.breadforthecity.org/Page.aspx?pid=183

    Calvary Services: began as a single emergency shelter in the basement of a church in 1983. Since then the organization has grown to offers housing and services to homeless women through three programs – Calvary Women’s Shelter, Sister Circle, and Pathways. Women who come to Calvary find more than a safe place to live and basic needs like nutritious meals. Calvary also provides women educational programs, employment opportunities, personal support from case managers, mental health services, addiction recovery support and much more. http://www.calvaryservices.org/
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  • Capital Interfaith Hospitality Network (CIHN): is non-profit coalition of religious and community organizations serving homeless families in Washington, DC. Since 1996, the members of our network have offered shelter and meals to families in need. For our guest families, CIHN is a way station of support and companionship on their journey toward self-sufficiency and for our volunteers it is an opportunity to serve and to achieve a better understanding of poverty and homelessness. http://www.cihn.org/
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  • The Coalition for the Homeless: is a non-profit organization that has served the Washington metropolitan area since 1980. Its mission is to help homeless, at-risk individuals and families return to self-sufficiency and independent living, through a range of residential and social services. The Coalition was conceived by the Interfaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington in 1979, it was originally established as an advocacy organization to address the issues of homelessness in the District. In 1985, the Coalition evolved into a direct provider of services to the homeless, and it currently operates 13 program facilities across Washington, D.C. http://www.dccfh.org/
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  • Community Family Life Services (CFLS): was originally founded in 1969 by members of First Trinity Lutheran Church in Judiciary Square to provide support for ex-offenders and their families. CFLS provided direct services such as food, clothing and transportation assistance, along with employment assistance, helping them and their families take the first steps out a life of poverty. Since then, Community Family Life Services has been hard at work in the Washington, DC community to help put Washingtonians who are low-income and homeless on the road to hope, homes, and a future through a holistic approach aimed at addressing the root causes of their poverty. http://www.cflsdc.org/home.cfm
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  • DC Central Kitchen: began its first phase of operations on January 20, 1989, redistributing the excess food from the Presidential inauguration. Since that time, DC Central Kitchen has used the kitchen as a central location to recover unused food, prepare and deliver meals to partner social service agencies, train and employ homeless men and women for the food service industry, and intellectually engage volunteers. As a community kitchen, we recycle over one ton of surplus food each day that would otherwise go to waste and turn it into 4,500 meals for the hungry in the greater Washington, DC region. Among the people preparing these meals are the students of our Culinary Job Training program; once homeless and hungry individuals themselves, these aspiring men and women are equipped with professional and life skills. http://www.dccentralkitchen.org/ 
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  • Legal Aid Society of the District of Columbia: was formed in 1932 by a group of lawyers.  They undertook ambitious goals: first, to “provide legal aid to indigent persons” and, second, “to encourage measures by which the law may better protect and serve their needs.” Over the years, Legal Aid has pursued this mission with vigor. Hundreds of thousands of the District residents living in poverty have obtained assistance from Legal Aid lawyers to resolve their disputes.  Our clients are in crisis. More than 110,000 - nearly one in five - District residents live below the federal poverty line. As a result of rapid changes in the District’s housing and development patterns, life has become more difficult for these individuals and families. http://www.legalaiddc.org/
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  • Sasha Bruce Youth Work: one of the largest and most experienced providers of services to youth in Washington, DC.  The organization helps young people find safe homes, achieve and maintain good health and mental health, create and strengthen supportive and stable families, explore opportunities in education and careers, and become tomorrow’s leaders. Through 18 professionally staffed programs located throughout the city, Sasha Bruce Youthwork helps young people and families discover their own abilities to transform their lives. http://www.sashabruce.org
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  • DC Jobs with Justice: is a coalition of labor organizations, community groups, religious organizations and student groups dedicated to protecting the rights of working people and supporting community struggles to build a more just society.   http://www.dcjwj.org/
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  • Alexandrians Involved Ecumenically (ALIVE):  ALIVE!, the largest private safety net for those in need in the City of Alexandria, is dedicated to helping Alexandrians faced with emergency situations or long-term needs become capable of assuming self-reliant roles in the community.  It is primarily staffed and managed by volunteers representing 39 religious congregations. http://www.alive-inc.org/
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  • The Arlington-Alexandria Coalition for the Homeless (AACH): is a private non-profit organization that provides transitional housing and support services to homeless families and women in Arlington County and the City of Alexandria in Virginia.  AACH offers homeless people more than just a roof over their heads; AACH provides a foundation to help them rebuild their lives. Members from several religious groups in Arlington and Alexandria created AACH in 1985 to meet the critical needs of the homeless in our communities. The AACH mission is to move people into a permanently self-sufficient, independent life. http://www.aachhomeless.org/
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  • Communities of Faith United For Housing (CFUH): is an advocacy network of faith communities in the Fairfax/Falls Church community who are committed to increasing the supply of affordable housing within our community with a special focus on providing permanent housing opportunities for those at the lowest levels of income who are either homeless or dangerously close to becoming homeless.  http://cfuhfx.org/ 
  • Homestretch: Empowers homeless families with children under age 18 in northern Virginia to return to stable housing and self-sufficiency by giving them the skills, knowledge and hope they need to become productive participants in the community.  Homestretch offers on site a series of services that, when taken together, surround the families with such a holistic array of care that it is possible for the families to make dramatic transformations in their lives. http://homestretch-inc.org/
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  • Fairfax County Alliance for Human Services (AHS): Improves the quality of life in our county by strengthening and promoting human services. We are individuals who support human services, public and private human service providers,local organizations, groups and congregations.  Our main tasks are to build increased public support for all human services in the county, advocate for better human service funding in Fairfax County budgets, identify and advocate for unmet needs and undeserved populations, stimulate and support effective advocacy by concerned citizens and organizations. http://fairfaxalliance.org/
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  • Fairfax Area Christian Emergency & Transitional Services, Inc. (FACETS): is an organization providing comprehensive programs and services, including supportive housing, basic needs assistance, and counseling, to men, women, and children who are homeless or are otherwise precariously housed in Fairfax County, VA.  http://www.facetscares.org/
  • SERVE: A Manassas-based community organization whose programs include shelter, a food distribution center, transitional housing, emergency assistance and life skills education for individuals and families in need. Their service area is Western Prince William County and the cities of Manassas and Manassas Park. http://www.serveinc.org/
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  •  Loudoun Interfaith Relief, Inc: is a food pantry. They provide their clients with an emergency supply of groceries. They provide a well-balanced, nutritious supply of food to prepare three meals a day (breakfast, lunch and dinner) for three days for any size family.  For hours of operation and more information, visit http://www.interfaithrelief.org/
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  • Shelter House: Shelter House provides temporary emergency housing and supportive services to homeless families in order to enable them to transition into permanent housing and a stable family life. http://www.shelterhouse.org/
  • Social Action Linking Together (SALT): is a faith-based legislative advocacy network seeking to positively influence public social policy and legislation on behalf of low-income Virginia families, especially at the State and local levels.  They are constantly researching legislative issues and selecting priority issues for action, advocating for legislative issues, building relationships and rapport with legislators, educating and raising awareness within parishes, and training others to participate.  For more information, visit http://www.s-a-l-t.org/ 
    Western Fairfax Christian Ministries; Homeless Prevention (WFCM): is the premier homelessness prevention agency of Fairfax County.  For nearly twenty years WFCM has successfully provided answers and solutions for their neighbors in need within the geographic areas of Centreville, Clifton, Chantilly, Fair Oaks and Fairfax Station, Virginia. For more information, visit http://www.wfcmva.org/
    Northern Virginia Affordable Housing Alliance (NVAHA): is a broad-based regional organization dedicated to the creation of successful communities through affordable housing education and advocacy. The Alliance supports public policies that promote the preservation and new construction of affordable housing choices throughout Northern Virginia for households of all incomes.  For more information, visit http://www.nvaha.org/

  • Interfaith/Interfaith Dialogue
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  • Abraham’s Vision:  Abraham’s Vision is a conflict transformation organization that explores group and individual identities through experiential and political education. Examining social relations within and between the Jewish, Muslim, Israeli, and Palestinian communities, we empower participants to practice just alternatives to the status quo. http://www.abrahamsvision.org/home/
  • American Academy of Religion: Founded in 1909, the AAR is the world's largest association of academics who researches or teaches topics related to religion. The Academy is dedicated to furthering knowledge of religion and religious institutions in all their forms and manifestations. This is accomplished through Academy-wide and regional conferences and meetings, publications, programs, and membership services. http://www.aarweb.org/
     
    Interfaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington: Created in 1978, the InterFaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington (IFC) brings together eleven historic faith communities to promote dialogue, understanding and a sense of community among persons of diverse faiths and to work cooperatively for social and economic justice in metropolitan Washington.  IFC members are the Baha’i, Buddhist, Hindu, Islamic, Jain, Jewish, Latter-day Saints, Protestant, Roman Catholic, Sikh and Zoroastrian faith communities among others.  We work towards creating a just community through coalition-building, education, training and advocacy, by uniting diverse faith leaders to speak and act together, networking with other groups, publishing community resources and holding public events involving music, award ceremonies and lectures. We also work to deepen mutual interfaith understanding through a thoughtful process of dialogue.  http://ifcmw.org
    Jewish Islamic Dialogue Society of Washington: JIDS is a Muslim-Jewish interfaith organization with members from different mosques and synagogues. They organize dialogues between Jews and Muslims to enlighten each group about the other so they can work together on projects to uplift the communities, the nation and the world. http://www.jids.org/
    International Council of Christians and Jews:  The ICCJ member organizations world-wide over the past five decades have been successfully engaged in the historic renewal of Jewish-Christian relations. Founded as a reaction to the Holocaust, in the awareness that ways must be found to examine the deeply engrained roots of mistrust, hatred and fear that culminated in one of the worst evils in human history, theologians, historians and educators included the still fragile structure of enlightenment and the human rights movements of the inter-war period. http://www.iccj.org/en/ Religions for Peace—USA: Religions for Peace-USA is the largest representative interreligious collaboration in the United States. At RFP-USA, we seek to translate deeply held and widely shared values into concrete multi-religious action through program-ming initiatives with three foci of championing religious difference, building community, and mentoring emerging leaders. http://www.rfpusa.org/
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  • Interfaith Alliance: The Interfaith Alliance celebrates religious freedom by championing individual rights, promoting policies that protect both religion and democracy, and uniting diverse voices to challenge extremism. They believe that religious freedom is a foundation for American democracy, individual rights and matters of personal conscience must be held sacred, religious and political extremists are a threat to individual liberty and democracy, and celebrating religious and cultural difference is the way to achieve a vibrant community. http://interfaithalliance.org/home  
  • Interfaith Families Project: The Interfaith Families Project of Greater Washington is an independent community of interfaith families and others committed to sharing, learning about, and celebrating our Jewish and Christian traditions. It is the only interfaith organization of its kind in the country. http://www.iffp.net/ 
  • Interfaith Fairness Coalition of Maryland: The Interfaith Fairness Coalition of Maryland is a coalition of individuals and associations drawn from many religious persuasions that support efforts to foster more positive perspectives on GLBT people within religious bodies, implement a program of public education and awareness to counter societal oppression of GLBT people, nurture a robust, broadly based, statewide interfaith coalition that will develop advocates, for fair treatment of GLBT people, and educate each other on our diverse faith communities, teaching respect by example, so that our interfaith understandings are informed from practice. http://www.ifcmd.info/index.html 
    Montgomery County Office of Community Partnerships: Created by County Executive Ike Leggett in 2007 to help break down the barriers of race, income, religion, and sector that too often divide the residents of Montgomery County and to build bridges between community residents and our County government. The office works to strengthen the capacity of the County's faith-based and nonprofit organizations as essential community partners. http://www.montgomerycountymd.gov/cpstmpl.asp?url=/content/EXEC/partnerships/contact/overview.asp
    Interfaith Community Against Domestic Violence: The purpose of Interfaith Community Against Domestic Violence is to educate, train, and support faith communities in addressing intimate partner abuse. They are dedicated to interfaith work because they believe that all of the world's great religions oppose family violence and offer a path of peace, compassion, justice, and love in human relationships to their believers. http://www.ifcadv.org/     
    Washington Interfaith Network (WIN): Washington Interfaith Network (WIN), founded in 1996, is a broad-based, multi-racial, multi-faith, strictly non-partisan, District-wide citizens’ power organization, rooted in local congregations and associations. WIN is committed to training and developing neighborhood leaders, to addressing community issues, and to holding elected and corporate officials accountable in Washington, DC. http://windc-iaf.rapidhost.net/index.php
    The Arlington Interfaith Council (AIC): is comprised of 48 religious congregations working together in a joint, practical effort to meet urgent and ongoing human needs in our community.  Meetings are held monthly (except July and August) on the third Monday at 7:30 p.m. and are hosted by member congregations. The agenda includes presentations by community leaders and congregation representatives, as well as reports from Helping Hands agencies, to keep us alert to the needs and opportunities for reaching out with help.  http://www.arlingtonva-interfaith-council.org/ 
    Interfaith Communities for Dialogue:The Community Interfaith Liaison Office (CIL) facilitates and supports community interfaith dialogues. Community dialogues are organized within communities by its residents, local faith communities and community based organizations to foster interactive multicultural and interfaith dialogue for better understanding within communities. Dialogues include community wide gatherings of 80 to 100 people and small dialogue circles of 16 to 20 people. Other initiatives include multicultural and interfaith community service projects, picnics and book clubs.   http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/dsm/cil/cil_communitydialogues.htm
    Fairfax County’s Faith Communities in Action (FCIA): is a program run by Fairfax County’s Community Liaison Office to strengthen and create collaborative human service efforts between community and interfaith groups and Fairfax County. FCIA holds regular meetings every other month and on an as needed basis. http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/dsm/cil/fcia.htm
    Peace by Piece: is an interfaith group formed by members of Congregation Adat Reyim in Springfield, VA, the Burke Presbyterian Church and the Rumi Forum in Washington, DC. Peace by Piece actively promotes dialogue, joint worship, and friendship among it’s members. For more information please e-mail Larry Kugler at: lbkugler@aol.com 
    Reston Interfaith: Promotes self-sufficiency through support and advocacy for those in need of food, shelter, affordable housing, quality childcare, and other services. http://www.restoninterfaith.org/     
     Virginians Organized for Interfaith Community Engagement (VOICE): is a multi-faith citizen’s organization rooted in local congregations and other volunteer associations to act on issues such as affordable housing and immigration that affect the lives of low, working, and middle-income Norther Virginia residents.  http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/dsm/cil/cil_communitydialogues.htm
    Tikva: The Loudoun Center for Peace and Understanding:  is a non-profit organization whose mission is education, through dialogue and community programming, in order to provide bridges between different religious and cultural groups and promote a more peaceful community and world.  More information is available through: TIKVA: The Loudoun Center for Peace and Understanding, P. O. Box 394, Ashburn, VA 20146-0394
    Loudoun Bridges: Builds relationships for interfaith dialogue, goodwill, education and service.  Brings together communities of different faiths, to collectively address common challenges, and to build bridges of understanding and respect between diverse religious and ethnic entities. http://www.loudouninterfaithbridges.org/
      
    Unity In The Community; People of Faith Concerned About Discrimination in Prince William County:  Shares and discusses concerns about discrimination in Prince William County. http://www.unityitc.org/.   
    United Community Ministries: is a community based social service agency whose mission is to assist families and individuals to improve the quality of their lives in a manner that builds their self-esteem and fosters their ability to function at the greatest level of their capacity- socially, economically and emotionally.  http://www.ucmagency.org/
     
    Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy (VICPP): The Virginia Interfaith Center is Virginia’s only statewide interfaith partnership focused on faith-based citizenship and advocacy. VICPP’s mission is to speak for and with the vulnerable and work for a just and compassionate Commonwealth by uniting and empowering faith communities. http://www.vicpp.org/
     
    Volunteer Loudon: The Loudoun County Volunteer program provides information, referral, training, and recognition of volunteer activities in Loudoun County. The Volunteer Services program helps solve community problems through volunteerism, For more information, visit http://www.loudoun.gov/
    Volunteer Arlington: promotes civic engagement and active volunteer participation to meet local needs and enrich the lives of Arlingtonians. We welcome the opportunity to help you or your organization become more involved in the Arlington community.  For more information visit http://www.arlingtonva.us/Departments/HumanServices/volunteer/HumanServicesVolunteerVolunteerOffice.aspx
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  • Volunteer Alexandria The Alexandria Volunteer Bureau (AVB): was established in 1980 by former Virginia state legislator Marian Van Landingham. Since its founding, AVB continues to serve as a link between individual volunteers and area nonprofit organizations and events. During its successful history, Volunteer Alexandria has continued to work in partnership with nonprofit and government agencies, as well as the corporate community, to address issues that can be impacted and improved in the city through volunteering.  For more information contact
    https://www.1-800-volunteer.org/1800Vol/alexandria-volunteer-bureau/OpenVolQuickProfileAction.do?linkToCreateGroup=true
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  • Alliance for Virginia Students: Promotes adequate public policy and funding support from the Commonwealth of Virginia for excellence in public education from pre-kindergarten through graduate studies, by engaging in informational and advocacy activities with the general public and state policy makers.  For more information, visit http://www.vastudents.org/
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  • Greater Washington Interfaith Power and Light (GWIPL): a non-profit initiative that helps congregations, religious institutions and others in the Washington, DC area work for a more just, sustainable and healthier creation by reducing the threat of global warming. http://www.gwipl.org/
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  • Mary's Center: In 1988, Mary’s Center was founded as a community-based nonprofit focused on maternal and child care for immigrant women from Central America in the predominantly Latino areas of Ward One. Today, Mary’s Center is a Federally Qualified Health Center that provides primary care and enabling services to underserved, underinsured and uninsured immigrants primarily from Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia.  Two clinics are operated in Wards 1 and 4 in Washington, D.C.  Mary’s Center serves low-income, immigrant families whose linguistic and cultural needs would otherwise go unmet by public or private health care systems. We link families to community services, informing them about the educational, housing, and employment resources available to them. All our social and educational services are provided at no cost, and no one is turned away from our medical services for lack of payment. http://www.maryscenter.org/about.html
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  • Interfaith Immigration Coalition:  Is a national partnership of faith-based organizations committed to enacting fair and humane immigration reform that reflects our mandate to welcome the stranger and treat all human beings with dignity and respect.  Coalition members work together to advocate for just and equitable immigration policies, educate faith communities, and serve immigrant populations around the country.  http://www.interfaithimmigration.org/
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  • JustNeighbors: Provides immigration legal services to low-income immigrants and refugees of all faiths and nationalities through their offices in Northern Virginia. Their team of attorneys, staff and committed volunteers offers hope and help as immigrants seek to navigate the current immigration system and access benefits that will enable them to become more contributing members of society. Through their community outreach efforts and volunteer program, Just Neighbors fosters mutual understanding between immigrants and the larger community in which they live. http://www.justneighbors.org/
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  • Tenants and Workers United: is an association of African American and Latinos that live in Northern Virginia. They first got together in 1986 when redevelopment in the Arlandria area of Alexandria threatened to evict thousands of families. They fought for over ten years to save their homes and in 1996 were able to create housing cooperative that is democratically owned and operated by the people who live in it. Through this struggle they learned about the power of organized community and collective action. Today, they continue to fight for economic and social justice.  http://www.tenantsandworkers.org/
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  • Immigration
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    Jews United for Justice: The mission of Jews United for Justice (JUFJ) is to lead Washington-area Jews to act on our shared Jewish values by pursuing justice and equality in our local community. We are a community of folks of all ages and from all over the greater Washington area. JUFJ provides Jews with an opportunity to weave together Judaism and activism and creates a community in which to explore and strengthen commitments to both. Embedded in our Jewish tradition is the concept of tikkun olam (repairing the world), which teaches us that as Jews we have a responsibility to alleviate the suffering of the oppressed, both within and outside our community. Once slaves in Egypt--and strangers in many lands since--we learn from our history and liturgy the importance of adding our voices to a universal call for justice. As members of a community that has experienced both prejudice and privilege, we have a unique understanding of and commitment to social justice wherever we find ourselves. As Jews of the greater Washington, DC community, we strive to be agents of change, repairing the world by concentrating on issues of local concern. http://jufj.org/ 
    Moishe House: Moishe House opened its first house in Oakland, California in 1976, with four Jewish friends who were all excited by the idea of creating a vibrant Jewish community out of their own home. Since opening its first house, Moishe House now has 28 houses in 8 countries (one in Silver Spring, MD and Adams Morgan, DC)  that serve as hubs for the young adult Jewish community with an emphasis on ages 21-30. Moishe House provides a rent subsidy and a program budget for a handful of young, eager, innovative Jews to live in and create their vision of an ideal Jewish communal space. http://www.moishehouse.org/index.asp
      
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: inspires citizens and leaders worldwide to confront hatred, promote human dignity, and prevent genocide. The Museum is a public-private partnership, federal support guarantees the Museum’s permanence, and its far-reaching educational programs and global impact are made possible by donors nationwide. http://www.ushmm.org/
    The Washington DCJCC: strives to preserve and strengthen Jewish identity, heritage, tradition and values through a wide variety of social, cultural, recreational, and educational programs and services. The Center accomplishes these goals in ways that reflect the unique location and role of the Center in the nation's Capital and the many contributions of the American Jewish community in the United States. The Center activities are open to all residents of the metropolitan area. The Washington DCJCC is a member of the Jewish Community Center Association (JCCA), a beneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation of Greater Washington, and a designated agency of the United Way. http://washingtondcjcc.org/
     
    Yachad: the Jewish Housing and Community Development Corporation of Greater Washington, D.C.  The group mobilizes the resources of the Jewish community to support commercial and housing redevelopment, creating new opportunities for both skilled Jewish professionals and Jewish volunteers of all ages to put into action two central Jewish values: tikkun olam – repairing the world -- and tzedakah – righteousness.  Yachad approaches each new endeavor with two goals in mind: to revitalize communities and build meaningful relationships between Jews and the diverse neighborhoods of our extended community. http://www.yachad-dc.org/ 
     
  • Health
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  • Loudoun Volunteer Caregivers (LVC): is a Faith in Action program, and a non-profit coalition of more than 150 volunteers from Loudoun County who help frail elderly and disabled adults maintain independent living. LVC provides a wide range of support services including transportation to medical appointments, grocery shopping, meal preparation, household chores, special outings and help with managing personal financial affairs. http://www.lvcaregivers.org
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  • Northern Virginia AIDS Ministry (NOVAM): is to educate the community about HIV/AIDS, to combat the fear, prejudice, and complacency that surround the disease, and to provide direct services to meet the needs of those who are living with HIV/AIDS. They pledge to serve all those who have been touched by this epidemic, regardless of gender, race, disability, creed, sexual orientation, or national origin.  http://www.novam.org/
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  • The Unified Prevention Coalition of Fairfax County Public Schools: Promotes prevention and early intervention for violence and drug use in their community through School-Community Coalitions, FCPS Countywide Initiative to Reduce Underage Drinking (CIRUD), raising public awareness of current youth trends and provides results for annual FCPS Youth Surveys (Everyone's Child), education programs for students and parents,support for school-based programs, prevention curriculum, community information meetings,communication/partnership with law enforcement agencies,student drug education intervention seminars, and peer mediation conflict resolution training. http://unifiedpreventioncoalition.org/